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Critics' Reviews

amg review
Released in Europe on Castle Communications and distributed in the U.S. on Domino Entertainment, a label founded by producer Rob Fraboni, the album's tracks were all shuffled into a different order except for "A Little Bit of Love," "It Don't Come Easy," and "Use That Power." An oddity, but you could put the CD in your player on the shuffle setting and it would remain one of journeyman Alvin Lee's finest statements. The stellar track here is "Real Life Blues," which hit in spots around the states, notably in Texas and in Massachusetts. It was a Top 30 hit on the Billboard charts in Boston when the regional papers published such tracking. The track featured the unmistakable sound of George Harrison on slide guitar and Deep Purple keyboard player Jon Lord. This is a wiser, slower, more methodical sentiment than we once heard Lee make on "I'd Love to Change the World." A 16 page booklet accompanies the cover photo (the bull's eye on Lee's guitar), it's the other side of the flash guitar Lee's been known for. "A Little Bit of Love" is Ten Years After meets Power Station with thunderous drums and very smooth production. Steve Gould and Deena Payne's backing vocals chirp over Alan Young's boom-boom drumbeat on "The Price of Love," a bonafide dance tune that cries for the kind of production that the band Chic made famous -- dance blues. "Moving the Blues" is a fun, Delaney & Bonnie type rocker with Clarence Clemons on tenor sax. Clemons appears on four tracks, including "Use That Power," "Jenny, Jenny" -- a Little Richard meets Mitch Ryder by way of Chuck Berry fun stomper -- and the funky "Wake Up Moma" which has that trademark Jon Lord keyboard filling in nicely. The instrumental "Lost in Love" is very tasteful. This is a major '60s/'70s figure making music on his own terms and it is very satisfying. ~ Joe Viglione, Rovi